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ADFRP

4.3 Transferring rehabilitation authority from the CDF to the MRCC

Section 39 of the MRCA provides that the Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) is the rehabilitation authority for all serving members, including Permanent Force Members, Reservists on continuous full-time service (CFTS) and Reservists not on CFTS which includes part-time, inactive and standby Reservists.  This applies regardless of whether they are covered under the Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2004 (MRCA) or the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (SRCA).

4.1 Overview of the ADF Rehabilitation Programs

The Chief of the Defence Force is the rehabilitation authority for all serving members, including Permanent Force members, Reservists on continuous full-time service (CFTS) and Reservists not on CFTS which includes part-time, inactive and standby Reservists. This applies to ADF members regardless of whether they are covered under the Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2004 (MRCA) or the Safety, Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1988 (SRCA).

4.1.3 The ADF Medical Employment Classification System

The table below provides broad definitions of the five categories within the Medical Employment Classification (MEC) system.

The MEC is determined according to each member's primary military occupation. The assessment takes into account the environment in which the person is expected to perform when deployed, as well as any additional tasks which a member could be expected to perform as part of their general military duties. The MEC is reviewed on an ongoing basis to ensure that it is appropriate for the person's current circumstances.

4.6.2 Transitioning clients from ADF to DVA

Please note that the Defence and DVA points of contact noted below are currently under review. Should there be any situations where contact is necessary please refer the matter to the Deputy Commissioner Victoria

Phase Two

There are two distinct phases of activity regarding serving members who are severely injured, have multiple and complex needs and who may also be classified as 'high profile' cases. Following are the Phase Two activities.

4.6.1 The ADF Process

Please note that the Defence and DVA points of contact noted below are currently under review. Should there be any situations where contact is necessary please refer the matter to the Deputy Commissioner Victoria.

There are two distinct phases of activity regarding serving members who are severely injured, have multiple and complex needs and who may also be classified as 'high profile' cases.

Definitions

A case will be high profile if:

4.6 Severely Injured and Transitioning ADF Clients

Definitions

A case will be high profile if:

  • the member was involved in a major incident involving deaths and/or severe injuries; or
  • the case could attract media attention.

A case will be complex if it is likely to require a greater input of resources, both in terms of the number of stakeholders involved and the input required from the ADFRP or Rehabilitation for Reservists Program Rehabilitation Consultant.

A Case Complexity Flags Model is used to assess:

4.4.2 Eligibility for CTAS

Qualifying service for the CTAS may be an aggregate of different periods of service, and can also be for service in one or more of the Army, Navy or Air Force.

The Career Transition Assistance (CTA) levels for the various types of separation from the ADF and qualifying service (as at the date of separation) are as follows.

CTA Level

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