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3.11 The accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot program

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Last amended 
15 September 2017

Accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot

The accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot is a 2017-18 Budget measure.

The pilot will enable 100 clients who have lodged their first claim for liability under the Military Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 2004 (MRCA) to be referred for a whole-of-person rehabilitation assessment and development of a rehabilitation plan before their claim for liability is accepted. In some circumstances, such as when a person has urgent rehabilitation needs, is judged to be “at risk” because of their health conditions, or has very straightforward vocational rehabilitation needs, some rehabilitation activities may also commence prior to the claim being finalised.

The pilot will run for six months, and will be evaluated at the end of this period. This pilot will be managed by the Western Australian rehabilitation team. Participants will be drawn from all states and territories of Australia.

The DVA psychosocial assessment team will identify potential participants for the pilot.  

These policy guidelines, and the procedural information guide have been developed to guide decision making and processing for the accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot.

Why the pilot is being undertaken – principles underpinning the pilot

Early intervention is regarded as a best practice approach to rehabilitation. Early access to rehabilitation helps to facilitate participation in employment and community, improved quality of life and a focus on recovering wellbeing from the earliest opportunity. 

There is a growing body of evidence which shows that the longer a person is out of work, or disengaged from their community, friends or family, the greater the time it takes for them to return to employment and a productive and meaningful life.

Assessing a claim for liability can take some months, and for complex claims, where for example, a diagnosis is not finalised, this can take even longer. This means that there can be a similar delay in the person being able to think about and define their rehabilitation goals, focus on the future and transition to civilian life.

Eligibility for participation

Participation in the scheme is voluntary. Clients who wish to participate in the pilot must:

  • have lodged a claim for either one or more specified rehabilitation conditions;
  • be regarded as being likely to benefit from participation in an accelerated access to rehabilitation program;
  • provide their consent to participating in the accelerated access to rehabilitation program; and
  • either have separated, or have a definite date of separation from the ADF.

Clients who meet these criteria will be able to gain accelerated access to rehabilitation services, during the period after the person has made a claim for liability under section 319(1)(a) of the MRCA and before liability for that claim has been determined.

Specified rehabilitation conditions

Legislative Instrument 2017 no. MRCC 22 determines who will be eligible for accelerated access to rehabilitation services. In this instrument, a specified rehabilitation condition means a medical condition or a mental health condition listed in column 1 of the table in this section.

Column 2 provides the reference to the Statement of Principles that apply for that condition.

Column 1

 

Column 2

 

Medical conditions

1.

Achilles Tendinopathy and Bursitis

subsection 7(2) of the Statement of Principles concerning Achilles Tendinopathy and Bursitis (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 97 of 2015)

2.

Chondromalacia Patella

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Chondromalacia Patella (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 80 of 2010)

3.

Cut, Stab, Abrasion and Laceration

 

subsection 7(2) of the Statement of Principles concerning Cut, Stab, Abrasion and Laceration (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 54 of 2016)

4.

Dislocation

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Dislocation (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 25 of 2010)

5.

Fracture

 

subsection 7(2) of the Statement of Principles concerning Fracture (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 95 of 2015)

6.

Internal Derangement of the Knee

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Internal Derangement of the Knee (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 52 of 2010)

7.

Intervertebral Disc Prolapse

 

subsection 7(2) of the Statement of Principles concerning Intervertebral Disc Prolapse (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 44 of 2016)

8.

Joint Instability

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Joint Instability (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 33 of 2010)

9.

Labral Tear

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Labral Tear (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 95 of 2010)

 

10.

Lumbar Spondylosis

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Lumbar Spondylosis (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 63 of 2014)

 

 

11.

Non-melanotic Malignant Neoplasm of the Skin

 

subsection 7(2) of the Statement of Principles concerning Non-melanotic Malignant Neoplasm of the Skin (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 8 of 2016)

12.

Osteoarthritis

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Osteoarthritis (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 14 of 2010)

13.

Plantar Fasciitis

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Plantar Fasciitis (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 52 of 2015)

14.

Rotator Cuff Syndrome

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Rotator Cuff Syndrome (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 101 of 2014)

 

 

15.

Sensorineural Hearing Loss

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Sensorineural Hearing Loss (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 6 of 2011)

16.

Shin Splints

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Shin Splints (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 10 of 2015)

17.

Solar Keratosis

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Solar Keratosis (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 74 of 2012)

18.

Sprain and Strain

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Sprain and Strain (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 95 of 2011)

19.

Thoracic Spondylosis

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Thoracic Spondylosis (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 65 of 2014)

20.

Tinnitus

 

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Tinnitus (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 34 of 2012)

 

Mental Health conditions

21.

Alcohol Use Disorder

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Alcohol Use Disorder (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 2 of 2009)

 

22.

Anxiety Disorder

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Anxiety Disorder (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 103 of 2014)

 

23.

Depressive Disorder

subsection 7(2) of the Statement of Principles concerning Depressive Disorder (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 84 of 2015)

24.

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 83 of 2014)

 

25.

Substance Use Disorder

paragraph 3(b) of the Statement of Principles concerning Substance Use Disorder (Balance of Probabilities) (No. 4 of 2009)

If the person has lodged a claim for any of the 25 conditions listed in this table, the first criteria is met.

It is important to note that it is not sufficient for the client to have been receiving treatment for the five specified mental health conditions through the non-liability health care arrangements. They must have lodged a claim for liability for one of the twenty five specified conditions in order to be eligible to participate in the pilot.

Likely to benefit from participation in an accelerated access to rehabilitation program

The second criteria that must be met is whether the person is likely to benefit from participation in an accelerated access to rehabilitation program. The information gathered from the pre-liability needs assessment/social worker initiated psychosocial assessment will help to inform this judgement.  Other information, such as medical reports provided in support of the claim could also be considered.

It is important to note that only clients who have either separated from the ADF, or have a definite date of separation, will be eligible for the accelerated access to rehabilitation program. This is because Defence is the rehabilitation authority for all current serving ADF members and their rehabilitation needs should be being met through these programs up until the date of their separation.

Provision of consent to participating in the accelerated access to rehabilitation program

Participation in the accelerated access to rehabilitation program is voluntary. The pilot manager will clearly explain the parameters of the pilot with each client, so that they understand that an early referral for a rehabilitation assessment and development of a rehabilitation plan does not provide any guarantee that DVA will accept their claim for liability. It is also important that the client appreciates that if liability is disallowed, not all of the activities included on the plan may be able to be progressed by a community based or other government provider. Planning for this possibility will therefore need to be an important part of the development of the rehabilitation plan.

After the client has been contacted by the pilot manager and they have discussed their participation in the pilot, a letter will be sent to the client. The letter invites them to participate in the accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot and explains that they will be referred to a rehabilitation provider, for a whole-of-person rehabilitation assessment. If the client does not want this to occur, then they are requested to contact the pilot manager and advise them of this. If the client does not “opt out” of the assessment, then it is taken that they have provided their consent to participating in the pilot.

All 3 criteria must be met before the person can participate in the accelerated access to rehabilitation program.

Why were these eligibility criteria chosen?

Specified rehabilitation conditions

The 20 specified medical rehabilitation conditions have been identified as conditions which are most commonly related to service in the ADF and claimed by clients. This means that it is more likely that clients with these conditions may have their claims for liability accepted. Using these conditions is a risk management approach that provides the greatest opportunity for the client to be able to progress to their DVA rehabilitation plan being implemented.

The five specified mental health rehabilitation conditions are those conditions that were covered under the Non-Liability Health Care (NLHC) arrangements prior to 1 July 2017. This means that clients can access treatment for these conditions without the need to establish a link to their ADF service. Further information about NLHC can be found in DVA fact sheet HSV109 - Non liability health care.  Using these conditions helps to ensure that clients with commonly occurring mental health conditions are able to get support through either a DVA rehabilitation program, or a community based rehabilitation program.

Identifying pilot participants

The psychosocial assessment team will identify potential pilot participants using the following criteria. The client has:

  • lodged a claim for one of the 25 specified rehabilitation conditions; and
  • separated from the Australian Defence Force (ADF) or has a definite date of separation from the ADF; and
  • urgent needs for support, or has been judged as being “at risk” due to health, financial, housing, relationship or family instability, or social isolation; or
  • recently moved to a new location where they do not have a support network; or
  • indicated that they are interested in, or would like to access rehabilitation support; or
  • indicated that they would they are currently not working and would like to claim incapacity payments; or
  • raised issues that indicate that they are likely to experience barriers to self-managing their health conditions.

This list is not exhaustive. The social worker/needs assessment delegate has the discretion to refer a client to the pilot manager, as long as they are satisfied that:

  • the person has separated from the ADF or has a definite date of separation;
  • that they have lodged a claim for one of the 25 specified conditions; and
  • they are likely to benefit from participation in an accelerated access to rehabilitation program.

When making a judgement about whether a person is likely to benefit from participating in the accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot, social workers/needs assessment delegates are asked to be mindful of the risks for clients if they commence rehabilitation activities, and then need to be transitioned to a community based or other government provider because their claim for liability has been disallowed. This applies particularly to clients with any of the five specified mental health conditions, who have not been accessing evidence based treatment for these conditions, either through the non-liability health care arrangements, VVCS, or any other arrangements.

It is expected that the rehabilitation provider will work with the client to identify potential sources of support in their community to help them to reach their rehabilitation goals, and to identify activities that clients can work on independently, if their claim for liability is disallowed. However, it is important that a judgement is made, based on discussions with the client, about whether the risk of losing momentum or becoming disheartened would mean that the client may not benefit from participating in the pilot.

Need assessment delegates/psychosocial assessment team members can access information about identifying and nominating pilot participants, and referring a client to the pilot from chapter 3 of the Rehabilitation Procedures Library.

It is recommended that if the pilot manager has any concerns, that they discuss this with the social worker who conducted the psychosocial assessment prior to making contact with the client. This is because where mental health symptoms are severe, or the client is not accessing appropriate treatment, it may be more appropriate to wait until liability has been determined, and for treatment needs to be met first, before rehabilitation needs are considered.

The pilot manager can also contact Rehabilitation advisers in their location, or the rehabilitation policy team at rehabilitation@dva.gov.au for advice.


Why are potential pilot participants being identified through the needs assessment process?

Pre-liability needs assessments are now a standard process for all MRCA clients who have served in the ADF after 1990. Once a claim has been lodged for liability under the MRCA, for an injury sustained after 1990, a social worker or psychologist will contact the client by phone and conduct a psychosocial assessment. This information will help to inform a decision about whether the person is likely to meet the criteria of likely to benefit from participating in an accelerated access to rehabilitation program.  

At present, when any urgent needs are identified that place the client “at risk”, such as financial or housing vulnerability, risk of suicide or self-harm, drug or alcohol use or other issues, a referral is made to a community based provider in the client’s local area. This may include, for example, local mental health providers based at community health centres.

It is important that the social worker/needs assessment delegate considers whether the client has pressing treatment needs that need to be met before rehabilitation needs are considered. This may also help to indicate whether there are any risks for the client if a DVA rehabilitation plan is developed, and then they need to be transitioned to another provider if their claim for liability is not accepted.

If the social worker/needs assessment delegate is comfortable that this risk can be managed, then they will provide some basic information about the pilot to the client, gain their consent to being contacted, and refer the client to the pilot manager using the standard referral template.  

What rehabilitation activities can commence before liability is accepted

Some rehabilitation activities can commence prior to liability being accepted. These can commence where either:

  • it is identified that the client has urgent needs that place them at risk; or
  • the client has very straightforward vocational rehabilitation needs and it is cost effective to provide these services immediately rather than waiting for liability to be accepted.

Support to address urgent needs

The type of support that can be provided to support urgent needs may include:

  • assistance through a medical management rehabilitation plan to help the client to find appropriate medical providers, especially a GP, in their location, or to provide encouragement/reminders/support to arrange and attend medical appointments;
  • time-limited financial counselling where the person is experiencing financial distress or anxiety because of their financial situation;
  • psychosocial rehabilitation support to overcome barriers to rehabilitation that need to be addressed as a matter of priority including brief intervention counselling to assist with pain management or learning to manage living with a disability; and
  • support to address housing vulnerability including referral to community agencies that provide emergency accommodation or support to people at risk of homelessness.

Providers should also be aware of, and provide information about, the services that can be provided through the Veterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service (VVCS) and support that can be accessed through Operation Life on line and the At Ease website.  

Support to address straightforward vocational rehabilitation needs

Where the pilot manager has assessed the proposed rehabilitation plan and made a judgement that the client only has vocational rehabilitation needs that are very straight forward, then the following types of supports can be provided:

  • limited assistance with job seeking (including for example, identifying potential employment roles and employers in the person’s community, how to approach employers etc);
  • developing skills in writing job applications (for example, provision of models to follow, basic skills training in addressing selection criteria etc); and
  • preparation of a CV (for example, provision of a template to follow and review of drafts).

It is not expected that comprehensive vocational rehabilitation assessments will be conducted as a pre-liability activity.

Developing the rehabilitation plan

The accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot provides an opportunity for clients to think about and discuss their rehabilitation goals from an earlier point. It is therefore expected that, consistent with DVA’s usual approach, the rehabilitation plan that is developed has a whole-of-person focus and includes a range of activities to assist the person to meet their stated rehabilitation goals. It is expected that the plan will be comprehensive enough so that it can commence as soon as liability is accepted, without the need for further amendment.

Planning for change is an important life skill. It is therefore expected that the provider and the client will discuss activities that the client can continue with, and community organisations that they can connect with, if their claim for liability is disallowed. These may be included on the rehabilitation plan, to reinforce the importance of identifying alternatives so that momentum is not lost. This will help to ensure that the client’s progress towards their goals can still continue if they need to be transitioned to a community based provider such as Job Network services, to assist with return to work goals, or VVCS to assist them to develop strategies to manage their mental health conditions.

The pilot manager will forward a specific accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot plan template to the provider at the time that the referral for a rehabilitation assessment is made. Where the rehabilitation assessment indicates that the client has urgent needs, or straightforward vocational needs, pre-liability goals and activities to assist the client to reach these goals can be included on the plan template.  The pre-liability rehabilitation activities can commence once this section of the plan is signed by the client, rehabilitation provider and pilot manager.

It is important to note that participation in the accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot is voluntary. While it is a clear expectation that pilot participants will fully participate in their approved pre-liability rehabilitation activities, there is no legal obligation for them to do so.

Post-liability goals and activities need to be clearly identified in the post-liability section of the pilot rehabilitation plan template. This section should only be signed by the client, provider and pilot manager after liability has been accepted.  Once liability is accepted, the standard rehabilitation rights and obligations apply and the client should be provided with the relevant rights and obligations form.

Roles and responsibilities

The pilot manager is responsible for:

  • contacting potential participants for the pilot who have been suggested by the social worker/needs assessment delegate, based on evidence from information gained from the pre-liability needs assessment or the psychosocial assessment conducted for MRCA clients;
  • liaising with the rehabilitation team in the client’s location to identify a rehabilitation provider with the most appropriate skills, experience and qualifications to conduct a rehabilitation assessment and develop a whole-of-person rehabilitation plan which will be appropriate for the client’s needs and circumstances;
  • making the referral to the rehabilitation provider for a whole-of-person rehabilitation assessment and development of a rehabilitation plan;
  • ensuring that the provider clearly understands the types of support that can be provided through the accelerated access to rehabilitation program and will have good skills in managing the client’s expectations appropriately and ensuring that they understand that if their claim for liability is disallowed, they will be referred to another government or a community based provider;
  • ensuring that all relevant information including, if appropriate, information from the psychosocial assessment from the needs assessment process is forwarded to the rehabilitation provider with the referral request;
  • ensuring that the rehabilitation plan that is developed has a whole-of-person focus;
  • following up with the social worker/needs assessment delegate to discuss any urgent needs that have been identified if appropriate;
  • where appropriate, approving pre-liability rehabilitation activities so they can commence before the client’s claim for liability is accepted;
  • ensuring that the rehabilitation plan is approved in principle, so that it can commence as soon as liability is accepted;
  • informing the rehabilitation provider and the client as soon as the claim for liability has been accepted, and the rehabilitation plan can commence;
  • ensuring that the rehabilitation provider has relevant community based rehabilitation contacts so that if liability for claimed conditions is not accepted, the client can still access support to address at least some of their rehabilitation goals; and
  • recording all information relevant to the pilot, to enable an evaluation to be conducted.

The rehabilitation provider is responsible for:

  • conducting a whole-of-person rehabilitation assessment upon receiving a referral from the rehabilitation coordinator;
  • discussing the client’s whole-of-person goals and working with them to develop a comprehensive rehabilitation plan to assist them to reach these goals;
  • managing the client’s expectations and ensuring that they understand that if their claim for liability is not accepted, they will be referred to a community based or government provider, such as Job Network, who may not be able to offer the same type of whole-of-person support as a DVA rehabilitation plan;
  • working with the client to identify, and plan for them to link with community based or government providers if their claim for liability is disallowed;
  • identifying pre-liability goals and activities on the pilot rehabilitation plan template which the pilot manager will forward as part of the referral and submitting this to the pilot manager for approval;
  • commencing specific pre-liability rehabilitation activities once the pilot manager has determined that these can commence;
  • ensuring that the rehabilitation plan has a whole-of-person focus and clearly identified post liability rehabilitation goals and activities that can commence as soon as liability is accepted;
  • ensuring that the client has accessed a GP in their location who may be able to take on a case management role if needed if the client’s claim for liability is disallowed;
  • working with the client to progress their rehabilitation plan as soon as they are advised that liability has been accepted and the plan can commence; or
  • referring the client appropriately so that they can receive community based rehabilitation services if their claim for liability is disallowed; and
  • ensuring that the transition to an alternative provider has occurred before the case is closed.

Managing the expectations of clients and their families

It is essential that clients and their families understand that:

  • participation in the accelerated access to rehabilitation program does not mean that their claim for liability will be accepted; and
  • they will not be able to access compensation payments or other similar types of benefits including household services, until the claim for liability has been determined.

However, if they choose to participate in the pilot, then they will be able to access rehabilitation services, such as a rehabilitation assessment and development of a rehabilitation plan from an earlier point.

If their claim is disallowed, then they will not be able to continue to access rehabilitation services from DVA. They will also not be able to be provided with compensation payments or health treatment from DVA for the specific conditions for which they lodged the claim. However, if they have been provided with a DVA Health Card for specific conditions (white card) through the Non- Liability Health Care (NLHC) arrangements, the client will be able to continue to access health treatment for their NLHC conditions only.

While the information sheet provided to potential participants explains this, it is essential that this is reinforced by the pilot manager and the rehabilitation provider, and discussed before the rehabilitation assessment is conducted, and the rehabilitation plan is developed. Needs assessment delegates/psychosocial assessment team members can access this information sheet from the R&C support site, under the heading "Accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot program".  

It is important that clients understand that the accelerated access to rehabilitation program provides an opportunity for them to identify and discuss their rehabilitation goals from an earlier point, and if appropriate, commence some specific rehabilitation activities.  Participation in the pilot provides an opportunity for clients to become motivated and positive about rehabilitation from an earlier opportunity. If either the pilot manager or the provider become concerned about the client’s motivation or willingness to progress their rehabilitation as quickly as possible, then this may mean that this is some doubt about whether the second criteria of “likely to benefit from participation in an accelerated access to rehabilitation program” has in fact been met. It may therefore be necessary to re-evaluate whether the client should participate in the program.

It is also important that risks of the client commencing rehabilitation activities and then having to cease them, if their claim for liability is disallowed, are considered before the client is accepted for participation in the pilot. This is because hand over to a community based provider will need to occur fairly quickly if the claim for disability is disallowed.

The pilot manager must ensure that clients participating in the trial understand that if their claim for liability is accepted, and they begin to receive incapacity payments, then they will no longer be regarded as voluntary rehabilitation participants. Instead, they will be expected to fully participate in their rehabilitation plan, and meet all of their rehabilitation obligations. The pilot manager must therefore ensure that once the client’s claim for liability is accepted, the client is provided with the relevant information explaining their rehabilitation rights and obligations.

What happens if the claim for liability is not accepted?

If the client’s claim for liability is not accepted, then the rehabilitation provider will be expected to refer the client to another government, or a community based provider with the appropriate skills, qualifications and experience to be able to provide them with the support and services that they require. Examples of relevant community based or other government providers include Centrelink and Job Network services, community education providers such as TAFE or Adult Education classes, the Veterans and Veterans Families Counselling Service (VVCS), ex-service organisations and veteran community groups such as Mates4Mates or Soldier On. Section 6.8 of this library contains a number of useful links to ex-service organisations.

This referral should occur regardless of whether the client decides to appeal the decision to disallow their claim. This is because the client is still likely to have needs that can be addressed by an alternate provider. This approach will also help to ensure that wherever possible, momentum is not lost, and the client can continue to work towards their goals.

The information gathered from the rehabilitation assessment, the psychosocial assessment and the needs assessment will inform the decision about the best agency/organisation to refer the client to. In some cases, the provider may need to make a referral to more than one agency so that the full range of the client’s needs are met. For example, if the client has both employment, mental health and housing needs, the provider may need to refer them to a crisis/community housing organisation; to a job network agency in their local area and to a provider such as VVCS who can provide evidence-based treatment to meet the veteran’s and family’s needs.

It is expected that planning for the possibility of liability being disallowed will be a key part of discussing the person's rehabilitation goals and activites and developing the rehabilitation plan. For example, the provider and client may work together to identify which organisations in the person's local community could be a potential source of alternative support. Specific goals and activities could also be identified that the client could work on independently if required. This will help to facilitate a timely transition to another provider.

If the rehabilitation assessment indicates that the person has mental health conditions, and the client has not yet been provided with a DVA Health Card for Specific Conditions (White card) through the Non-Liability Health Care arrangements, then the client should be encouraged to contact NLHC@dva.gov.au and request support, or complete DVA form 9213 available from the DVA forms site, and submit this, as quickly as possible.

It is essential that a “smooth handover” to another provider occurs, and that:

  • the information from the rehabilitation assessment and the resulting rehabilitation plan is forwarded to the new provider as quickly as possible to inform their work with the client. The client’s permission is required before this can occur;
  • there is some assurance from the new provider that the client can receive the services they need as quickly as possible, without any lengthy delays;
  • any mental health issues can be managed as quickly as possible, and that the client has access to support through the NLHC arrangements if they meet the criteria; and
  • the client’s family is able to access any support that they need through community based organisations such as for example, VVCS or Relationships Australia.

It is important that neither DVA nor the rehabilitation provider “close the case” until all referrals have been made to community based or other government organisations. The planning done during the rehabilitation assessment and development of the rehabilitation plan will help to ensure that the client has a good working knowledge of what community or other resources are available to them, that they can draw on to help them to reach their rehabilitation goals.

Payments for extended case management cannot be made after the claim for liability is disallowed. It is therefore important that the planning done during the development of the plan is drawn on, and that appropriate referrals are actioned in a timely way, so that that momentum can be maintained.

If the rehabilitation provider company delivers services on behalf of other government or community based organisations, it is expected that the individual consultant will refer the client to another consultant within the same company. This will help to prevent potential confusion for the client. A client-centric approach must always be utilised, to ensure that the client is able to receive all of the support that they require into the future.

DVA will not seek re-payment from the client of any costs that were incurred through the client’s participation in the accelerated access to rehabilitation program. This includes any case management costs and agreed transition costs which incur after the client has been advised that their claim for liability is disallowed.

Evaluation and data collection

The accelerated access to rehabilitation pilot will cease once 100 participants are identified and referred for an earlier rehabilitation assessment. After the pilot is complete, an evaluation will occur. This will help DVA to ascertain whether clients benefited from having earlier access to rehabilitation supports and will inform further improvements to our rehabilitation model.