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12.4 Psychosocial Rehabilitation under the VVRS

Page
Last amended 
20 March 2016

This topic relates to sections 2.2.4 and 3.2.2A of the VVRS Instrument.

Definition

Under section 1.3 of the VVRS Instrument, a psychosocial service is defined as a rehabilitative, skill-building or recovery-oriented service that aims to restore a person to his or her optimal level of independent functioning within the community.

Services must be reasonably required

A psychosocial service may be included in a vocational rehabilitation program (s2.2.5) or a rehabilitation program (s3.2.2A) if the services are reasonably required to:

a) assist the veteran to achieve or retain suitable paid employment; or

b) address an identified rehabilitation barrier as part of the process of assisting the veteran to achieve or retain suitable paid employment.

Identification of psychosocial services

A service will be considered psychosocial in nature if it is likely to make objective* and subjective** progress towards a psychosocial goal, in the wider context of achieving a suitable paid employment outcome for the individual.

*Objective progress refers to an assessment of a VVRS delegate, taking into account the advice from a rehabilitation provider.

**Subjective progress refers to the perception of a VVRS participant.

Goals may include, but are not limited to:

  • Self-management of the individual’s injury, disease or condition;
  • Increased and improved social interaction and community inclusion;
  • Meaningful engagement;
  • Management of a changed sense-of-self and emotions from living with and adapting to a long term illness or injury;
  • Improved living conditions.

Psychosocial services unlikely to be reasonable

An activity is not likely to be reasonable if:

  • The service will not make objective and subjective progress to a psychosocial goal, in the wider context of achieving a suitable paid employment outcome; or
  • The service does not comply with the individual’s medical restrictions (both physical and psychological); or
  • The service poses an unreasonable risk to the individual or others; or
  • The service cannot be approved according to the principles of cost-effectiveness; or
  • The service is an autonomous, self-directed or unsupervised activity and there is no credible evidence demonstrating that an activity of this nature is the most appropriate activity for the individual; or
  • The service is a form of medical treatment; or
  • The service does not comply with evidence based models and practices for psychosocial rehabilitation; or
  • The individual has already undertaken the service and is seeking reimbursement.

Psychosocial services may include, but are not limited to:

Psychosocial GoalsServices

Self-management of the individual’s injury or disease

  • Psycho-education
  • Medication adherence training
  • Illness self-management
  • Relapse prevention techniques
  • Assistance coping with symptoms
  • Skills of daily living
  • Family education strategies
  • Cognitive training
  • Drug and alcohol/substance management
  • Support groups

Increased and improved social interaction and community inclusion

  • Social skills training (organised group training such as ‘Toastmasters’ clubs and men’s sheds, individual counselling sessions to address social issues)
  • Personal relationship counselling
  • Community engagement programs (special interest groups: bee keeping clubs, art classes, dancing groups)

Meaningful engagement

  • Short-term, non-vocational, face-to-face educational courses

Management of a changed sense-of-self and emotions from living with a long term illness or injury

  • Counselling
  • Anger management
  • Lifestyle programs
Improved living conditions
  • Financial counselling

  • Housing/residential support

  • Transport support

  • Assistance with accommodation and tenancy obligations

 

Gymnasium and pool memberships

If a gymnasium or pool membership is assessed as an appropriate intervention under s2.2.4 or s3.2.2A this activity may be approved as a one-time activity for a maximum three month period. This policy reflects the SRCA/MRCA policy on gymnasium and pool members in Chapter 5.4.1 of this library.

Hiring of equipment

A psychosocial service may include the hiring of necessary and reasonable equipment to enable the individual to undertake the authorised activity.