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Australian Merchant Mariners

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Introduction

Australian merchant mariners can be eligible for benefits under the VEA. Their service must have been during World War 2.

What is an Australian mariner?

    

An Australian mariner is a master, officer, seaman or apprentice who was, during World War 2:

  • employed in sea-going service on a ship registered in Australia that was engaged in trading between a port in a State or Territory and any other port; or
  • employed in sea-going service on a ship registered outside Australia who was, or whose dependants were, resident in Australia for at least 12 months immediately before he or she entered into the agreement or indenture; or
  • employed on a lighthouse tender, or pilot ship of the Commonwealth or of a State; or
  • employed in sea-going service on a ship owned in Australia and operating from an Australian port, being a hospital ship, troop transport; supply ship, tug, cable ship, salvage ship, dredge, fishing vessel or fisheries investigation vessel; or
  • a member or employee of the Commonwealth Salvage Board engaged in sea-going service on a ship registered in New Zealand who the Commission is satisfied was engaged in Australia and is not entitled to compensation under a law of a Commonwealth country.     


Veterans' Entitlements Act 1986.

A master in the context of merchant mariners is a person other than the pilot having command or charge of a merchant ship assisting with the war effort.

An officer in the context of merchant mariners is a master, mate or engineer on a merchant ship assisting with the war effort.

A seaman in the context of merchant mariners is a person employed or engaged in any capacity except masters, pilots, officers and apprentices on a merchant vessel assisting with the war effort.

An apprentice in the context of merchant mariners is a young person indentured to a shipping company for sea service on a merchant ship with a view to becoming a ship's officer.