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Kidney or bladder stone

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Last amended 
17 June 2015

Malignant neoplasm of the bladder - Kidney or bladder stone Factor

A stone can develop in the kidney (i.e. nephrolithiasis or renal calculus); the stone can then pass into the ureter (i.e. ureteric calculus) or into the bladder.  Stones can also develop in the bladder itself.

Signs and symptoms

Stones may cause pain, nausea, vomiting, haematuria and fever from secondary infection. Treatment consists of medication for symptoms, and possibly lithotripsy, nephrolithotomy, or an endoscopic procedure to remove the stone.

Last Reviewed for CCPS 12 March 2008.

PRELIMINARY QUESTIONS [39115]

39124 there is some evidence that having a kidney or bladder stone may be a factor in the development of the condition under consideration.

39139  the veteran has had a kidney or bladder stone.

39140 the veteran has had a kidney stone at some time.

or

39141 the veteran has had a bladder stone at some time.

or

39142 the veteran has had ureteric calculus at some time.

39143 the veteran had the identified illness or injury, a kidney or bladder stone, before the clinical onset of the condition under consideration.

39145  the veteran has established the causal connection between the kidney or bladder stone and operational service for the clinical onset of malignant neoplasm of the bladder.

CLINICAL ONSET AND OPERATIONAL SERVICE [39145]

39144  the identified illness or injury, a kidney or bladder stone, is causally related to operational service.